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The 12 Best Canadian Whiskies on the Market

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Next to mezcal, Canadian whisky (no "e," eh?) is one of the world's most slept-on spirits. So slept-on, in fact, that while everyone was going gaga for vodka, tequila and bourbon, huge stocks of the country's finest whiskies were quietly resting in casks. Some managed to stay hidden away for two decades, readying themselves for their big moment in the spotlight.

That moment, friends, is now. A slew of well-aged Canuck classics and younger, even more exciting newcomers, are politely making their way across the border. Prepare yourself for some extremely affordable top-shelf offerings from the Great White North—no passport required.

Lot No. 40

Lot No. 40

First, a little background: Historically, Canadians have referred to their whisky as "rye," even though rye was often just used as a flavoring component in what is otherwise a spirit made from corn, wheat, and barley.

Second, much like the idea of paying to see a doctor, a mash bill is also a foreign concept in Canada. Instead, each grain is typically mashed, fermented, distilled and aged separately before being blended together for bottling (or, occasionally, another round of aging). That process actually allows the master distiller or blender a lot of latitude. He or she can dial up certain elements and bring others down, creating a spirit balanced to the blender's style.

Made at Windsor, Ontario's Hiram Walker Distillery, Lot No. 40 explodes with rye and baked bread. It's dry and peppery on the palate, a little punchier at 43 percent ABV, and still very smooth, with a huge mouthfeel, rich complexity, and spicy finish. It's no wonder that when it was re-released a few years ago (after being briefly discontinued during the 2000s), it took home a Canadian Whisky of the Year prize.

Read Next: The Best Whiskey Glasses

Pike Creek

Pike Creek

On the milder side, Corby's Pike Creek is another enticing smaller-batch offering, also made in Windsor and rested near Hiram Walker's Canadian Club barrels. Pike Creek undergoes huge temperature shifts between the area's muggy, hot summers and bone-chillingly cold winters.Consequently, there's a lot of interplay between the whisky and the American oak barrels in which it's first aged before taking a last dip in used port casks. The resulting whisky is soft, fruity, and pretty gentle over all, with nice hints of vanilla, cinnamon, and nut. Pike Creek finishes with a touch of red wine, giving it just the right amount of sweetness.

Masterson's 10 Year Old Straight Rye

Masterson's 10 Year Old Straight Rye

Courtesy of Drizly

Sonoma County's 35 Maple Street are the producers of Masterson's 10-Year-Old Straight Rye, another whisky crafted at Alberta Distillers. An outstanding rye no matter its origins, this one has big spice upfront, followed by a short whiff of coffee and dark chocolate that turns floral and grassy. Abundantly complex, with a nice 90-proof, Masterson's hits all the right notes.

JP Wiser's 18 Year Old Canadian Whisky

JP Wiser's 18 Year Old is made in the traditional lighter Canadian style. Rested in used Canadian whisky barrels, it takes on a lot of the wood’s characteristics; it's deep, with a hint of earth, smoke, freshly cut wood and rye on the nose. There's some citrus and astringency on the tongue, but all around, it's a very light, well-balanced example of the classic Canadian style—at a great price.

Alberta Rye Dark Batch

Alberta Rye Dark Batch

Courtesy of Minibar

There are only a handful of major distilleries in Canada, and Calgary’s Alberta Distillers is one of the biggest—and most respected. And a good deal of the rye that Americans drink—whether via Canadian or American brands—is made there. One of the feathers in the Beam Suntory–owned distillery's cap has been its Alberta Premium Dark Horse—a flavor-packed blend of 91 percent rye whisky, 8 percent Old Grand-Dad Bourbon from the Jim Beam plant in Kentucky, and 1 percent Oloroso sherry. As of April, it's available for the first time in the U.S., under the name Alberta Rye Dark Batch. This one smells of ripe fruit, toasted rye spice and a touch of cola before transforming into a deeply complex and smooth whisky with a lengthy peppery-sweet finish. At 45 percent ABV, its solid alcohol punch makes it great for sipping or powering through a whisky-forward cocktail.

Canadian Club Chairman's Select 100% Rye

Canadian Club Chairman's Select 100% Rye

Courtesy of Minibar 

Also from Alberta Distillers comes a new addition to the well-known Canadian Club line—Chairman's Select 100% Rye. But this is not the Canadian Club you've come to know (and possibly not love). There's nary a trace of that cloying caramel and thinness that its predecessor offers. Instead, the Chairman's Select comes through with peppy flavor and a little heat on the way down. Sure, it's not as uniquely nuanced as most of these other small-batch 100 percent ryes, but at $27, it's hard to go wrong with this one—especially as a mixing companion. Alas, for now, it's only available in Canada.

Lock, Stock and Barrel 13 Year Old Rye

Lock, Stock and Barrel 13 Year Old Rye

Courtesy of Drizly

One thing about distilling and aging each grain individually means that Canada has had a ton of 100 percent rye sitting around in oak for decades. In the past few years, a number of brands have smartly swooped in and bottled the pure stuff for those consumers who seek gorgeously rich and peppery whisky in its most robust form, often at a much higher than normal proof.

New York's Cooper Spirits bottle Lock, Stock and Barrel, an incredibly forward 13-year-old rye sourced from Alberta Distillers. It’s rested in charred American oak and bursts with flavors of wood, cinnamon, vanilla and a hint of banana. Another one with a big mouthfeel, LSB's well-rounded profile is complemented with nuttiness and a bright, smooth finish.

WhistlePig Straight Rye

WhistlePig Straight Rye

Courtesy of Drizly 

While WhistlePig is in the process of growing and distilling its own rye on a farm in Shoreham, Vermont, for now the 10-year-rested Straight Rye is made in Canada and bottled in the U.S. Any way you slice it, it's delicious. Bottled at 100-proof, WhistlePig is a bold, spicy and oaky whisky that's accented with clove, nutmeg and warm vanilla. Its equally expressive zing on the palate leaves a nice lingering finish.

Forty Creek Double Barrel Reserve Canadian Whisky

Forty Creek Double Barrel Reserve Canadian Whisky

Courtesy of Minibar

John Hall's hugely successful Forty Creek brand was recently purchased by Campari, but that hasn't changed how it make its spirits. While the company offers a cheaper Barrel Select mark, its higher-end (though still pretty darn affordable) bottles are among Canada's absolute best. The Double Barrel Reserve, as its name suggests, sees a second barreling, but this time in ex-bourbon casks. It has a sweet and complex nose that's just a little earthy, with notes of butterscotch, faint citrus and a touch of coconut. Its taste is rich, with lots of caramel, vanilla and oak that finishes with a pleasantly peppery sweet and dry balance. It’s full-bodied and delicious all the way through.

Confederation Oak Reserve Canadian Whisky

Confederation Oak Reserve Canadian Whisky

Courtesy of Total Wines

The Confederation Oak Reserve is rested in Canadian white oak that was planted sometime around Canada's confederation in 1867. Each component of rye, corn, and barley whiskies are first aged separately and then re-barreled together for this special release. It's got a lovely mellowed spice, some nuttiness, a little bit of fruit and really nice oaky notes which all come together delicately with a clean finish.

Crown Royal Single Barrel Whisky

Crown Royal Single Barrel Whisky

It's saying something when Canadian Club releases a 100 percent rye and Crown Royal puts out a cask-strength single-barrel bottling. The big guys are paying attention to the desires of high-end drinkers. Sadly, Crown Royal Single Barrel is only available at stores that agree to purchase a whole barrel, but hope springs eternal for a wider release, as it, too, is not your grandpa's Canadian whisky. It is distinctly a Crown Royal spirit, but at 103-proof, the grassy, earthy, woody notes hum alongside the rye flavors.

Caribou Crossing Single Barrel Canadian Whisky

Caribou Crossing

The Sazerac Company actually has about 20 different Canadian whiskies in its portfolio—all of varying degrees of quality. Near the top, though, is Caribou Crossing, another single-barrel offering that is sweet at first, with some toffee, vanilla and a little citrus on the nose. It soon turns pleasantly creamy and finishes with gentle pepper. Want something simpler? Sazerac's Royal Canadian Small Batch will do the trick for under $20.

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