The Basics Bar Tools

Schott Zwiesel Sensa White Wine Glasses Review

Functional, durable, and aesthetically pleasing for the price.

Schott Zwiesel Sensa White Wine Glasses
Image:

Liquor.com / Timothy Fatato

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Schott Zwiesel Sensa White Wine Glasses

Liquor.com / Timothy Fatato

We purchased the Schott Zwiesel Sensa White Wine Glasses so our reviewer could put it to the test in their home bar. Read on for the full review.

The Bottom Line: 

Schott Zwiesel’s Sensa white wine glasses are a great option for those looking for a middle-of-the-road option. While not as pricey as competing brands, you get what you pay for here. The glass is a bit heavy in the hand and the design is rather narrow, though the stem outperforms glassware at entry-level prices. Overall, the stem merits its price point and is great for backyard get-togethers or casual happy hours at home.

Pros: 

  • Sleek design
  • Durable

Cons:

  • Thick stem
  • Slightly heavy 
  • Small bowl

Buy on Williams Sonoma, $84

Schott Zwiesel Sensa White Wine Glasses

Liquor.com / Timothy Fatato

Our Review

White wine glasses are a dime a dozen, especially in the uber-affordable realm. However, not every occasion calls for an ultra-luxurious glass. As much as we love using high-quality stemware at our favorite wine bars and restaurants, casual backyard get-togethers and happy hours amongst friends certainly don’t scream for the same level of elegance. 

With that said, not all affordable wine glasses are created equal—and we still believe that glassware should contribute to a pleasurable drinking experience (after all, the stem does indeed make a difference as to how a wine smells and tastes).

Take Note

"For a middle-of-the-road stem that won’t break the bank, Schott Zwiesel’s Sensa white wine glasses are a great option."

We’ve tested many Riedels, Zaltos, and other higher-end glassware over the years, and these options remain rather reliable. However, they’ll cost you—generally at least $30 a pop. Rather than stooping down to the $10-and-under four packs, we decided to play around with the middle-of-the-road group, think $10-$15 per stem. Our first stop? Schott Zwiesel Sensa White Wine Glasses. 

Schott Zwiesel Sensa White Wine Glasses

Liquor.com / Timothy Fatato

Design

At first glance, the Schott Zwiesel White Wine Glasses are rather elegant, though in terms of functionality, the design is a bit lacking. The shape of the glass finds itself somewhere between an average white wine glass and Champagne flute, marked by a narrower bowl than usual. The slimmer shape and bowl seem to mute aromas a bit, and would likely benefit from being a bit wider. In the hand, the stem is a bit heavier than it looks, though isn’t as clunky as your average white wine glass.  

Take Note

"At $14 a pop, you get what you pay for: a nice white wine glass that delivers for the price point."

Schott Zwiesel Sensa White Wine Glasses

Liquor.com / Timothy Fatato

Material

Schott Zwiesel’s Sensa white wine glasses are made from Sensa crystal glass, which replaces lead with zirconium and titanium for strength and elegance. The glass claims to be chip- and break-resistant, though we cannot confirm that statement. Each stem is made from hand-blown glass in Germany. 

Cleaning

While Schott Zwiesel claims to be dishwasher safe, we always recommend hand washing wine glasses. Although we did not test the product in a dishwasher, by the weight of the stem in our hands, this is one we may actually take a chance on trying in the machine.

To wash by hand, simply rinse glasses immediately after use and set aside. When ready to wash, add a small amount of restaurant crystal clean into the bowl of the glass and use a cleaning brush or wash by hand. Tip: Hold the glass by the bowl to best avoid breakage. The stem is the most delicate part of the glass and is most likely to break from this position. Use cleaning cloths to hand dry /polish glasses. 

Note: Because of the slender bowl opening of the Schott Zwiesel Sensa glasses, cleaning by hand can be rather tricky. We recommend using a wine glass-specific cleaning brush.

Schott Zwiesel Sensa White Wine Glasses

Liquor.com / Timothy Fatato

Price/Competition

In terms of quality-to-price ratio, the Schott Zwiesel Sensa glasses are fine. At $14 a pop, you get what you pay for: a nice white wine glass that delivers for the price point. For those who use their wine glasses regularly (or aren’t afraid to share them with a crowd), stepping up to Riedel’s VINUM line (view at Bed Bath & Beyond) or comparable brands may be worth the investment. However, compared to other $10-$15 stems, like this one from Crate & Barrel, whose design (while aesthetically pleasing, totally misses the mark), is superior. 

Final Verdict

For those looking to enjoy their wine out of a middle-of-the-road stem that won’t break the bank, Schott Zwiesel’s Sensa white wine glasses (view at Williams Sonoma) are a great option. Although the glass would score higher in our book if it were a bit wider in size, the glass nonetheless remains durable, affordable, and aesthetically pleasing. Overall, the product merits its $14/stem cost, though there are certainly more affordable options of equal quality to be found.

Specs

  • Product Name: Schott Zwiesel Sensa White Wine Glasses
  • Product Brand: Schott Zwiesel   
  • Product Number/UPC/SKU: Model Number - 8890/2
  • Price: $84 - 6 Pack / $14 Single
  • Product Dimensions: 3 inches diameter, 8 3/4 inches high
  • Color Options: N/A
  • Material: Glass
  • Warranty (if any): N/A
  • What’s Included: 1 or 6 wine glasses

Why Trust Liquor.com?

Vicki Denig is a wine, spirits, and travel journalist who splits her time between New York and Paris. Her work regularly appears in major industry publications. She is the content creator and social media manager for a list of prestigious clients, including Sopexa, Paris Wine Company, Becky Wasserman, Volcanic Selections, Le Du’s Wines, Windmill Wine & Spirits and Corkbuzz. She is a Certified Specialist of Wine.