Cocktail & Other Recipes By Spirit Cognac & Other Brandy Cocktails

Hot Apple Pie

hand places dried apple garnish on the Hot Apple Pie cocktail, served in an Irish Coffee glass with a cinnamon stick
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Sheraton

Looking for something to warm you up when it’s cold out? Try the Hot Apple Pie from Smith & Whistle at the Sheraton Grand London Park Lane. It’s a cocktail with similar flavors as the traditional holiday treat, but without all that pesky baking.

The Hot Apple Pie features Calvados, mead, apple juice, lemon juice and cinnamon-infused honey. Calvados is a brandy made from apples or pears that hails from Normandy in France, and mead—made with honey, water and yeast—is thought to be one of the oldest alcoholic beverages on earth.

Fortunately, you don’t need to visit London to try this drink for yourself. Instead, you can make it at home whenever the temperature drops. The cinnamon-infused honey is easy to accomplish (you just add cinnamon sticks to honey), but it must sit for a few days to allow the flavors to incorporate, so the cocktail takes some forethought. Once your honey is ready, mix everything together in a pot and fire up the stove. You’ll be drinking some apple pie in no time.

Break out this cocktail during the holidays or whenever you want a satisfying treat. Mixing a glass of something delicious is far easier than baking an entire dessert.

Ingredients

  • 2 ounces Calvados

  • 1/4 ounce mead

  • 3/4 ounce apple juice

  • 1/4 ounce lemon juice, freshly squeezed

  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon-infused honey*

  • Garnish: 2 dried apple slices

  • Garnish: cinnamon stick

Steps

  1. Add the calvados, mead, apple juice, lemon juice and cinnamon-infused honey into a small saucepot and heat until near simmering, stirring occasionally.

  2. Strain into an Irish Coffee mug.

  3. Garnish with 2 dried apple slices and a cinnamon stick.

*Cinnamon-infused honey: Add 3 to 5 cinnamon sticks to a small jar (4-ounce capacity or so), and fill with honey of choice. Let sit 4 to 6 days, stirring occasionally, and remove the cinnamon sticks once the cinnamon flavor is satisfactory (i.e., present without being overwhelmingly strong).