Spirited Cooking: Popsicles

When we heard that the new book People’s Pops included recipes for adult treats featuring liquor, let’s just say we were a bit excited. Like beg-your-momma-for-a-dollar-and-run-after-the-ice-cream-truck excited.

The volume, which comes out tomorrow, was written by Nathalie Jordi, David Carrell and Joel Horowitz, who own the wildly popular Brooklyn shop of the same name. The trio started making frozen confections in 2008 with fresh produce from the famed Union Square Greenmarket and now has a devoted following around New York.

While you can buy their non-alcoholic pops in the Big Apple, the only way to taste the spirited ones is to whip them up yourself. Keep in mind that the base mixture can’t be more than 20 percent liquor or it won’t freeze properly. (Don’t have a mold? No need to worry. You can use shot glasses or even an ice cube tray.)

The authors were kind enough to share with us the recipe for their tasty Blueberry Moonshine Ice Pops (pictured above), which calls for, of course, blueberries and unaged whiskey (the commercially available stuff, please—we don’t want any trouble from the Feds), plus simple syrup and lemon juice.

Another good one to try is their tart-and-sweet Cantaloupe & Campari Ice Pops. The best part is that the formula contains just three ingredients and is the coolest thing we’ve found in a while to enjoy on a hazy, hot and humid afternoon.

Blueberry Moonshine Ice Pops

Contributed by Nathalie Jordi, David Carrell and Joel Horowitz
INGREDIENTS:

  • 22 oz (about 4.75 cups) Fresh blueberries
  • 5 oz Simple syrup (one part sugar, one part water)
  • 1 oz Fresh lemon juice
  • 3 oz Moonshine or other unaged whiskey

PREPARATION:
Pick out any stems or leaves from the blueberries and puree them in a food processor. You should have about 2.25 cups of purée.

Stir together the blueberry purée, simple syrup and lemon juice in a medium bowl or a pitcher with a spout. Taste and add more simple syrup or lemon juice if needed. (Do not oversweeten; blueberries tend to taste sweeter when frozen.) Stir in the moonshine.

If desired, strain out the blueberry skins by pressing the mixture though a colander or sieve using a wooden spoon or rubber spatula. Pour the mixture into ice-pop molds, shot glasses or ice-cube trays, leaving a little bit of room at the top for expansion. Insert food-grade popsicle sticks and freeze until solid, 4 to 5 hours. Unmold, and serve at once or transfer to plastic bags for storage. This recipe makes 10 pops.

Cantaloupe & Campari Ice Pops

Contributed by Nathalie Jordi, David Carrell and Joel Horowitz
INGREDIENTS:

  • 1 Cantaloupe (about 2 pounds), peeled and seeded
  • About 6 oz Simple syrup (one part sugar, one part water)
  • About 2 oz Campari

PREPARATION:
Cut the cantaloupe into large chunks and purée in a food processor. You should have about 2.25 cups of purée. Transfer to a bowl or a pitcher with a spout and stir in simple syrup until the mixture tastes quite sweet. Add Campari a little bit at a time until you can detect its flavor. (Campari is less alcoholic than most spirits, so this mixture can handle more of it, but it has such a strong presence that you want to be careful not to overdo it.)

Pour the mixture into ice-pop molds, shot glasses or ice-cube trays, leaving a little bit of room at the top for expansion. Insert food-grade popsicle sticks and freeze until solid, 4 to 5 hours. Unmold, and serve at once or transfer to plastic bags for storage. This recipe makes 10 pops.

(Reprinted with permission from People’s Pops: 55 Recipes for Ice Pops, Shave Ice, and Boozy Pops from Brooklyn’s Coolest Pop Shop by Nathalie Jordi, David Carrell, and Joel Horowitz, © 2012. Published by Ten Speed Press, an imprint of Crown Publishing Group. Photo courtesy Jennifer May)

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