New Study by Yale Professor Suggests Wine Makes You Smarter

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(image: Sebz)

Your dreams are about to come true when you hear this, wine enthusiasts. Though it’s commonly known that booze can kill a few brain cells, there’s a new study making wine a delicious exception. Doctor Gordon Shepard (aka our Doctor McDreamy) of the Yale School of Medicine conducted a study that’s in his new book Neuroenology: How The Brain Creates the Taste of Wine. Shepard’s findings showed positive correlations of wine affecting your brain power.

This genius doctor claims that sniffing and analyzing a glass of wine prior to consumption requires a monumental amount of control over the tongue’s intricate muscles and the usage of our thousands of taste and odor receptors. Doing this wine assessment alone takes more work from the brain than any other brain activity, including processing music and even math problems. How is this even possible? Because “the taste is not in the wine; the taste is created by the brain of the wine taster,” says Shepard.

Separate from this incredible news, we now know to focus on the wine drinker instead of reading the notes off of a wine label because Shepard just revealed something groundbreaking: The taste of wine is subjective. Yes, that’s right—wine is supposedly given its taste from the interpretation, memories and emotions of the drinker. Who knew psychology was such a major factor of the wine we enjoy? Just remember: Don’t go chugging an entire bottle of wine. Shepard warns that it’ll permeate your sensory system, plus that would just be awkward to explain to your boss why you drank an entire bottle of wine before doing your work.

Series & Type: NewsDrink to Your Health
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