Cocktail Recipes

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Haiballer

Shochu , Modern Classics

At Washington, D.C.’s Dram & Grain, the latest menu was dubbed Dram & Global, offering a series of drinks inspired from different cities across the world, including this Tokyo-style highball.

Whisky Contardo

Scotch , Modern Classics

With a little bit of care and thought, the old-school Whisky Mac can be reimagined and turned into something worthy of our more particular modern cocktailing palates, the Whisky Contardo, from bartender Adam Bernbach at Washington, D.C.’s 2 Birds 1 Stone.

Needful Things

Whiskey , Modern Classics

More refreshing than your average Irish Coffee, this drink from Drexl in Oakland, Calif., packs a surprising and delightful mix of flavors.

Whisky Mac

Scotch , Classics

This old timer’s whisky cocktail is shorthand for the Whisky Macdonald, so named for a Colonel Hector MacDonald, who first crafted the drink while serving during the British Raj in India. It’s a simple combination of blended scotch and Stone's Original Green Ginger Wine , a fortified wine described on the bottle as a "ginger flavored currant wine" with a 13.5 percent ABV.

Toronto

Canadian Whisky , Modern Classics

A dash of fernet spices up this 416-style Manhattan by Simon Ogden of Veneto in Victoria, British Columbia.

Green Tea Highball

Whiskey , Modern Classics

Two of Japan’s most famous beverages get cozy in this uplifting cocktail.

DIY Pink Gin

Gin , Classics

Adapted from the 1939 classic cocktail book The Gentleman’s Companion by Charles H. Baker, the original cocktail nods to the drink’s Navy roots, suggesting that the excess bitters “go back in the bottle, on the floor or out the porthole or window, depending upon who, where and what we are.”

Scottish Beats

Scotch , Modern Classics

Nodding to the classic Blood & Sand, this drink by Jason Percival, the bar manager at Boston’s Post 390, relies on beets for its dramatic rosy hue and a hint of sweetness.

Remember the Maine

Rye Whiskey , Classics

If you appreciate a good Manhattan—a rye Manhattan specifically—then the Remember the Maine will most likely find a home in your drinks repertoire. The cocktail comes from Charles H. Baker, Jr’s. The Gentleman’s Companion from 1939 and is notable for its additions of cherry liqueur and a touch of absinthe.

Rusty Nail

Classics

Cocktails don’t come much easier than this one, which has been around since the late 1930s. A lot of recipes suggest equal parts, but you’re better off starting with two ounces of scotch and a half ounce of Drambuie, tinkering until you find your personal ratio. No matter how you drink it, you’ll be channeling the Rat Pack in no time.

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