Summer Infusions You Can’t Help But Love

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It’s time for Endless Summer. Get the most out of the season while it’s still here.

The best thing about summer? Seasonal fruits. The best thing about summer fruits? Their endless possibilities to transform spirits into amazing cocktails. And there’s no easier way to do that than by infusing your favorite liquor with ridiculously juicy, ripe produce.

Vodka often gets all of the attention when it comes to infusions. As does tequila. Though these spirits can take on countless flavor combinations, why should they have all the fun?

In Eric Prum and Josh Williams’ new book Infuse: Water, Spirit, Oil, which was released in May, infusions range from fruity mezcal and bourbon to spicy gin.

One of the first boozy infusions featured in Infuse: Water, Spirit, Oil employs mezcal and pineapple. It’s a killer combination. The pineapple is roasted and over the course of two days imparts its flavor to the agave spirit. After straining, the infusion can be enjoyed neat or mixed in cocktails like the Margarita or the Mojito. The smoky notes of the mezcal and the caramelized flavors in the roasted pineapple complement each other extraordinarily well and give drinks a deep tropical flavor.

Another of Prum and Williams’ mouth-watering recipes is gin infused with both cool cucumber and spicy jalapeño. Anyone who’s familiar with the cuke-flavored Hendrick’s Gin will know how well the flavor combination works, but adding chile heat fires up Gimlets, Martinis and Gin and Tonics. The best part? The infusion requires a mere 12 hours.

Ready to infuse? Try these recipes while the pickin’s still fresh.

Roasted Pineapple–Infused Mezcal

Contributed by Eric Prum and Josh Williams
INGREDIENTS:

  • 12 one-inch cubes Fresh pineapple
  • 12 oz Mezcal

PREPARATION:
Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Place the pineapple on an unlined nonstick baking sheet and roast for one hour (or until slightly browned). Let cool.

Combine the pineapple and mezcal in a 16-ounce Mason jar, seal and shake for 30 seconds. Let sit at room temperature for 48 hours.

Strain through a cheesecloth, squeezing out any excess liquid. The infusion will keep in the refrigerator for up to three months.

Spicy Cucumber Gin

Contributed by Eric Prum and Josh Williams
INGREDIENTS:

  • 12 oz Gin
  • 10 slices Cucumber
  • ½ Jalapeño, cut lengthwise with seeds removed

PREPARATION:
Combine all ingredients in a 16-ounce Mason jar. Seal and shake for three seconds. Let infuse at room temperature for 12 hours or until the infusion is at the desired level of spiciness.

Strain through a cheesecloth. The infusion will keep in the refrigerator for up to two weeks.

 

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  4 Comments.

Discussion

  • briangore1969yahoocom805760457 posted 12 months ago

    bjjnova, While you do believe you know everything, I will say this. When you do infuse liquor you are correct with the shelf life comment, but what you are missing is the flavor. Over time the freshness does start to get a bitter flavor which is from leaving it to long over time. So it is best to use with in the recommended time.

  • Liquor.com posted 2 years ago

    You're right: The mezcal itself will not lose its integrity over this short period, but the flavor of the pineapple will. That's why the authors of Infuse: Water, Spirit, Oil recommend that timeline. Hope you enjoy!

  • bjjnova posted 2 years ago

    Anna: sorry but your being really silly. Mezcal last on shelf for years. You cannot possibly be changing its nature thru a 48 hour infusion to the degree that it will then only last 3 mos. Even if there is an infusion of sugars, it's not going to approach the sugar in say, Grand Marnier or any of the bottled buy at the store infusions. Why do you guys have to just make sh%$ up?

  • richard.melick.2682 posted 2 years ago

    Where can I find that bottle on the left? I would love to get a bunch of them.


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