A Taxpayer’s Liquor Guide: 2012

In 1913, the last of the 36 states required ratified the 16th Amendment, which allowed for a federal personal income tax. This important action also paved the way for the start of Prohibition, since it made up for the government’s impending loss of liquor-industry tax revenue. So we think it’s only fitting for you to use your rebate to splurge on some super-premium bottlings. (If you owe money, we have some more reasonably priced options.) Cheers!

Refund Splurge:

You’re going to need to travel to get your hands on the Bacardi Maestros de Ron Vintage MMXII Rum ($2,000; pictured above). The liquor is exclusively available at duty-free shops in a few foreign airports, including London’s Heathrow. It’s a mix of rums created by eight Bacardi family members, all former master blenders.
Accountant-Approved: Bacardi 8 Rum ($30)

Refund Splurge:

Milagro Unico Tequila ($300) is definitely for sipping and not shooting. The limited edition is a combination of a special blanco and a number of aged spirits that is then rested for 30 days before filtering. There are just 1,000 bottles allocated for the whole US.
Accountant-Approved: Milagro Silver Tequila ($30)

Refund Splurge:

Glenmorangie has been a leader in finishing single malts in different woods, and its latest offering, Artein ($80), certainly ups the ante. The whisky was matured in both a bourbon barrel and a cask that held vino from a Super Tuscan winery.
Accountant-Approved: Glenmorangie The Original Single Malt Scotch ($40)

Refund Splurge:

Celebrate your good fortune by enjoying a glass of something truly luxurious: Martell Cordon Bleu Cognac ($119), which observes its 100th anniversary in 2012. After a taste of the velvety spirit with fruity notes, you’ll be wishing that tax day came more than once a year.
Accountant-Approved: Martell VSOP Cognac ($48)

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